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Posts

July 27, 2015

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6:47 PM | Oregon grad student admits to faking data in four neuroscience papers
A graduate student at the University of Oregon in Eugene has admitted to faking data that appeared in four published papers in the field of visual working memory, according to the Office of Research Integrity. David Anderson’s supervisor at the time was Edward Awh, who has since moved to the University of Chicago. Anderson told Retraction Watch […] The post Oregon grad student admits to faking data in four neuroscience papers appeared first on Retraction Watch.
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3:30 PM | Penn State postdoc faked data in cancer manuscript
A former postdoctoral fellow at Penn State University faked numerous data and analyses in a manuscript submitted to Molecular Cancer Research, according to the Office of Research Integrity (ORI). In a notice released today, the ORI found Julie Massè: …knowingly falsified and/or fabricated Western blot images, by manipulating the images to give the desired results, […] The post Penn State postdoc faked data in cancer manuscript appeared first on Retraction Watch.
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1:30 PM | UPitt investigation brings total retraction count to four for pair of cancer researchers
An official inquiry by the University of Pittsburgh has led to two more retractions for a pair of cancer researchers, Tong Wu and Chang Han. By our count, the pair now have four retractions under their belt, all the result of the university investigation. The Journal of Biological Chemistry published the notices earlier this month, […] The post UPitt investigation brings total retraction count to four for pair of cancer researchers appeared first on Retraction Watch.
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1:03 PM | Autism Risk Genes: Success with the Simplex Approach
Studies of simplex families — those that have only one member with autism, rather than multiple members — are providing details of the disorder’s genetic basis
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1:00 PM | Outlier by the Bay
As we have mentioned before, San Francisco is almost always a bad choice when trying to find cities to use as examples for economics, social science or urban planning. We are all an outlier on one axis or another, but San Francisco is a serial offender. Due to a number of extreme conditions and a long string of historical accidents, it is almost impossible to generalize any kind of conclusion drawn about the city.But the very thing that makes San Francisco so unsuitable for analysis, also makes […]
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9:08 AM | I (non) marines che si suicidano
Sì, negli USA si suicidano 22 veterani (non "marines") l'anno. Ma non è detto che il dato sia statisticamente significante. The post I (non) marines che si suicidano appeared first on Il Post.
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5:00 AM | 3.2
- Figures sans paroles / Les figures sans paroles

July 26, 2015

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11:31 PM | New York Times features mathematician Terence Tao
The New York Times has published a feature article on mathematician Terence Tao of UCLA, regarded by some as the most brilliant mathematician alive. Terence Tao was born in Adelaide, Australia, the son of Chinese immigrants. His intelligence and mathematical precocity were evident at a very young age. He taught himself to read at age Continue reading New York Times features mathematician Terence Tao
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1:00 PM | Make Mathemusic with Me at Bridges
Join me for a workshop on mathematics, temperament, and pitch perception at the Bridges math+art conference in Baltimore. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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5:00 AM | 3.1
- Figures sans paroles / Les figures sans paroles

July 25, 2015

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1:30 PM | Weekend reads: Fame bias at journals; retractions as good news; hoarding data as bad news
This week at Retraction Watch featured the retraction of a widely covered paper on marriage and illness, and the resignation of a high-profile lab head in Toronto. Here’s what was happening elsewhere: “Is there fame bias in editorial choice?” A debate continues (paywalled). Retractions are “indicators of science’s unique and growing penchant for telling the truth,” […] The post Weekend reads: Fame bias at journals; retractions as good news; hoarding data […]
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5:00 AM | 2.37
- Figures sans paroles / Les figures sans paroles

July 24, 2015

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8:17 PM | Head of major diagnostic lab in Canada steps down amid investigation
A prominent endocrinologist has resigned from running the largest hospital diagnostic laboratory in Canada following an investigation that has uncovered evidence of falsified data in two papers, Retraction Watch has learned. Sylvia Asa was the Program Medical Director of the Laboratory Medicine Program at the University Health Network, affiliated with the University of Toronto, until this past […] The post Head of major diagnostic lab in Canada steps down amid investigation appeared […]
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8:14 PM | Naked Scientists on the Clay Millennium Prize Problems, f. Katie Steckles
The Naked Scientists Podcast has released an episode on the Clay Millennium Prize Problems, titled ‘The Seven Million Dollar Maths Mystery’. The episode description is: This week, we’re investigating the Millennium Prize Problems – a set of mathematical equations that, if solved, will not only nab the lucky winner a million, but also revolutionise the... Read more »
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6:00 PM | What do you do after painful retractions? Q&A with Pamela Ronald and Benjamin Schwessinger
2013 was a rough year for biologist Pamela Ronald. After discovering the protein that appears to trigger rice’s immune system to fend off a common bacterial disease – suggesting a new way to engineer disease-resistant crops – she and her team had to retract two papers in 2013 after they were unable to replicate their […] The post What do you do after painful retractions? Q&A with Pamela Ronald and Benjamin Schwessinger appeared first on Retraction Watch.
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6:00 PM | WS MoreOrLess: Life Expectancy
Ruth Alexander and the team return to the question of how long you might live. Those born today are expected to live six and a half years longer than those born in 1990 but can this trend continue?
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4:57 PM | Behind The Numbers: GDP, the Sequel
When the Commerce Department releases its first reading of second-quarter gross domestic product this coming Thursday, there will also be a spate of annual revisions. This happens every year and serves to give more retroactive perspective on the U.S.'s economic growth trajectory.
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4:30 PM | The World's Most Accurate Parquet Floor-Based Personality Test
Are you a neurotic loner or a charismatic cult leader? Try this highly scientific personality test based on a parquet floor from one of Antoni Gaudí's Modernista masterpieces to find out. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3:30 PM | “Part of a paper that had already appeared”: Materials paper pulled for plagiarism
Microporous and Mesoporous Materials has retracted a 2015 paper after it was discovered the authors “have plagiarized part of a paper that had already appeared.” The paper, “Ionic liquid assisted synthesis of flexible and super-hydrophobic porous gels,” described the synthesis of a form of flexible aerogels “through a facile one-pot preparation,” according to the abstract. According […] The post “Part of a paper that had already appeared”: […]
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1:30 PM | Author’s ties to NFL lead to correction for review that cast doubt on brain risk from sports
A review paper that suggested the degenerative brain disease that’s striking former football players may not be tied to contact sports has been corrected to reveal the first author spent decades working for the National Football League. The correction appears in a review in PLOS ONE about chronic traumatic encephalopathy – the degenerative brain disease that was the […] The post Author’s ties to NFL lead to correction for review that cast doubt on brain risk from sports […]
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1:00 PM | REPOST -- Maybe the [2012] Republican primary [was] going just as we should [have] expect[ed]
[This article by Sam Wang got me thinking about some posts I've been meaning to write about how most popular poll analyses could use more complex assumptions an about how everyone, including political scientists might benefit from more orthogonal data. I hit some of these topics four years ago so I thought I'd do a repost. Other than the correction of one typo, I'm leaving everything the way it was despite having some misgivings about the post.One thing I do want to emphasize is that this is […]
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5:00 AM | 2.36
- Figures sans paroles / Les figures sans paroles
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2:00 AM | Juillet 2015, 4ème défi
Pour la deuxième année, chaque semaine, un défi du calendrier mathématique... - Défis du Calendrier Mathématique / Actualité

July 23, 2015

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8:00 PM | The Rise of Computer-Aided Explanation
Computers can translate French and prove mathematical theorems. But can they make deep conceptual insights into the way the world works?
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7:51 PM | Q: When you write a fraction with a prime denominator in decimal form it repeats every p-1 digits. Why?
The original question was: How come the length of the repetend for some fractions (e.g. having a prime number p as a denominator) is equal to p-1? Physicist: The question is about the fact that if you type a fraction … Continue reading →
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5:51 PM | Earth-like alien world looms into view through Kepler telescope
The alien planet is a rocky world circling a sun-like star at a distance that should allow it to carry liquid water
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4:45 PM | PCMI Blog Roundup
Earlier this month, I had the opportunity to give a cross-program talk at PCMI, the Park City Mathematics Institute. I talked about how doing math online can help us reach others in the math community, building bridges between teachers, researchers, and … Continue reading →
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3:35 PM | Data “mismatch” and author’s illness pluck bird sex-ratio study from literature
Inaccessible data and an author’s illness are to blame for the retraction of a paper on sex rations of baby finches, according to the authors. The paper, “Experimental evidence that maternal corticosterone controls adaptive offspring sex ratios,” published in Functional Ecology, outlined how a hormone in mother finches can “skew” the number of males vs females that […] The post Data “mismatch” and author’s illness pluck bird sex-ratio […]
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1:30 PM | Cell biologist Hanna issues two errata; images mysteriously disappear from Imgur
Cell biologist Jacob Hanna, the highly cited stem cell researcher currently at the Weizmann Institute of Science,  has posted a long erratum for a 2005 paper in Blood for “inadvertent mistakes,” among other issues; soon after, Hanna’s team issued another erratum for a 2009 Cell Stem Cell paper. There’s more to tell: Last month, commenters […] The post Cell biologist Hanna issues two errata; images mysteriously disappear from Imgur appeared first on Retraction Watch.
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1:00 PM | The Apple Tax
From the Onion: Al Franken and the FTC are investigating the so-called “Apple Tax” for rival streaming servicesIn a sentence that would make frighteningly little sense to a someone who fell into a coma in 1995 and just awakened today, [As a side note, if I were writing for that publication, I don't think I'd open with a "things were sure different twenty years ago" gag. As a friend of mine mentioned in a conversation recently, twenty years ago, the Onion was the place to go for smart, […]
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