X

Posts

May 25, 2015

+
4:59 PM | The Racial Dot Map
Anna Haensch and Annie Rorem are the hosts of a new podcast, The Other Half. This post is based on the first episode, about racism and segregation. In episode one of The Other Half, we look to mathematics as a potential tool for understanding racism and segregation in our society. To get a sense of... Read more »
+
1:30 PM | Weekend reads, part 2: Oldest-ever PhD; most embarrassing citation ever; blame the antibodies?
As we noted Saturday, there was so much happening around the web last week that it made sense to break up Weekend Reads, especially since this is a holiday weekend in the U.S. and elsewhere. Here’s part 2: Last Wednesday, 102-year-old Ingeborg Rapoport became the oldest person to ever receive a PhD, righting a Nazi […] The post Weekend reads, part 2: Oldest-ever PhD; most embarrassing citation ever; blame the antibodies? appeared first on Retraction Watch.
+
1:00 PM | The New York Times has a class problem -- "Poor Little Rich Women"
Actually, it's not just a NYT problem -- it extends throughout the media -- but it has gotten particularly embarrassing with what is supposed to be our best paper. The NYT has always identified with the upper classes ("It does not soil the breakfast cloth") but recently it has come to focus on and empathize with the one percent to such a degree that the identification is distorting its journalistic judgement.We've seen irony-free articles about how hard it is getting by on 300K and op-eds on […]
+
7:46 AM | Ciao, John...
John Forbes Nash se ne è andato. Lo sapete certo già, e non staremo allora a dirvi di più. Lo celebrammo con un compleanno, tempo fa: uno dei pochi "compleanni" dedicanti a matematici viventi. Tanto vale ricordarlo così, rileggendo quanto scritto il giorno del suo 81° compleanno: in fondo, la matematica non ha ancora ben definito la differenza [...]
+
6:44 AM | How To Optimize Summer Travel And Not Get Blown Up
Every year I promise myself that I’ll just stay in one place for the summer, and every year that simply doesn’t happen. Today I’m posting from CIRM in Marseille, France. Next week I’m headed to Hong Kong to visit with … Continue reading →

May 24, 2015

+
9:32 PM | ESC 2015: Beim Publikum hat Italien gewonnen
Es war eine turbulente Nacht beim Eurovision Song Contest in Wien – und am Ende hieß der Sieger Schweden. Doch hätte allein das Publikum entschieden, wäre der Schwede Måns Zelmerlöw nur Dritter geworden. Platz zwei wäre an Russland gegangen – … Weiterlesen →
+
8:51 PM | John Nash
Non solo A Beautiful Mind The post John Nash appeared first on Il Post.
+
7:48 PM | 10 COSE CHE (FORSE) NON SAPETE SU JOHN NASH, IL MATEMATICO CHE ISPIRÒ BEAUTIFUL MIND
L'incidente che sabato scorso ha ucciso il Premio Nobel John Nash e la moglie Alicia Larde ha suscitato grande commozione nel mondo, anche tra persone non direttamente legate al mondo accademico. Nash infatti era noto per avere ispirato il film interpretato da Russel Crowe "Beautiful Mind", vincitore del Premio Oscar.  Ma quanto sappiamo di John Nash? Molte sono le cose dei film che non corrispondono alla realtà, o che vengono taciute. Proviamo a raccontarle attraverso alcuni aneddoti […]
+
5:58 PM | Descanse en paz el genial matemático John F. Nash, Jr.
Entre 1950 y 1959 el genial John Forbes Nash Jr. revolucionó varias áreas de las matemáticas. Si un problema no era imposible, no merecía su atención. Pero sucumbió ante la esquizofrenia cuando se enfrentó al problema matemático más difícil […] Leer más La entrada Descanse en paz el genial matemático John F. Nash, Jr. fue escrita en La Ciencia de la Mula Francis. Entradas relacionadas: Carnaval de Matemáticas 2.2: John W. Milnor gana […]
+
4:23 PM | ADDIO A JOHN NASH: IL GENIO DI "BEAUTIFUL MIND"
John Nash (86 anni) e la moglie Alicia Larde, 82 anni, hanno perso la vita sabato in un incidente d'auto due erano a bordo di un taxi sulla Turnpike, una strada larghissima, con più di dieci corsie, che attraversa il New Jersey. Stavano rientrando dalla cerimonia di assegnazione del premio Abel.John Nash - Prometheus72 / Shutterstock.comIl tassista sembra abbia perso il controllo della sua Ford Crown Victoria mentre cercava di superare una Chrysler e si è schiantato sul guard rail con a […]
+
3:19 PM | 'Beautiful Mind' John Forbes Nash, Jr killed in a car crash
The legendary Princeton mathematician John Forbes Nash, Jr was killed earlier today in an unfortunate car crash in New Jersey. He and wife, Alicia Nash were killed in the incident. John Nash was the 1994 winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics for his work in game theory, and earlier this year he was awarded
+
2:33 PM | RIP John Nash
John Nash, famous for his work in game theory and the subject of the film A Beautiful Mind, has died in a car crash, according to the BBC. As well as winning the (in memory of but not actually a) Nobel Prize for Economics in 1994, Nash was recently awarded the Abel Prize for his work on nonlinear partial... Read more »
+
12:00 PM | Proof, Pudding, and Pi: Math Books that Will Make You Hungry
Need some summer reading? How to Bake Pi by Eugenia Cheng and The Proof and the Pudding by Jim Henle show us that math and cooking have more in common than you might think. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
7:00 AM | Getting an insight into Einstein's worlds
From a row about time to a bad paper on black holes, there's lots to learn about Einstein from a clutch of books published at the centenary of general relativity

May 23, 2015

+
1:48 PM | Weekend reads: Gay canvassing study redux; editors fired; how the world’s biggest faker was caught
This week at Retraction Watch was dominated by the Science same-sex marriage study, after we broke the news Wednesday morning that one of its authors had requested its retraction. (And crashed our servers in the process.) So the first section of this Weekend Reads will focus on pieces following up on that story: The New […] The post Weekend reads: Gay canvassing study redux; editors fired; how the world’s biggest faker was caught appeared first on Retraction Watch.
+
11:00 AM | WS MoreOrLess: Death Penalty 23 May 15
Death Row exoneration statistics. Recently it’s been claimed that for every nine people executed in the US, one person has been exonerated. Is this true – and do the statistics vary state to state?
+
9:00 AM | Einstein and Schrödinger: The price of fame
From personal feuds to fruitless quests to overhaul quantum theory, the two physics legends fought hard to maintain their fame, argues a new book
+
5:00 AM | Seen recently at the food blog
From A Statistician Walks into a Grocery Store...

May 22, 2015

+
6:37 PM | Behind The Numbers: A Busted ‘Time Series’
The Current Population Survey provided reliably comparable data on the number of uninsured Americans--until last year.
+
4:00 PM | MPS Awardee Spotlight: Sharon Glotzer
Sharon Glotzer was appointed a Simons Investigator in Theoretical Physics in 2012. She is the John W. Cahn Distinguished University Professor of Engineering and the Stuart W. Churchill Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Michigan. Glotzer, who has broad research interests in materials science and soft matter physics, also holds the title of professor of materials science and engineering and professor of physics at the University of Michigan.
+
4:00 PM | MoreOrLess: Female Drink Drivers 22 May 15
The Police Federation says female drivers aren’t heeding the drink drive warnings. Tim Harford attempts to find out the numbers behind this. Plus: the Rotterdam Effect; Death Row exonerations; pub closures; and owl counting.
+
3:35 PM | Katie Steckles is Greenwich University ‘Mathematician in Residence’
Our very own Katie Steckles is currently residing mathematically in the University of Greenwich’s Stephen Lawrence Gallery. She’s there until Tuesday the 26th, doing a variety of numerical, geometrical and otherwisely logical things for anyone who pops along. Here are a few of the highlights so far, picked from Katie’s Twitter feed: Almost finished day 1. Have... Read more »
+
3:30 PM | Chip slip: Irreproducibility erases computer memory paper
Researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences have retracted a paper in Nanoscale about an experimental computer chip after they were unable to recreate their published results. “We retract this article to avoid misleading readers and intend to undertake further tests to confirm our previous results,” they write in the notice. The scientists are working […] The post Chip slip: Irreproducibility erases computer memory paper appeared first on Retraction Watch.
+
1:30 PM | “The first author assumes all responsibility:” Malaria vaccine article retracted for image manipulation
Authors of a 2012 article in Infection and Immunity investigating a malaria vaccine strategy are retracting it because it “contains several images that do not accurately reflect the experimental data.” The paper, “Fine Specificity of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein Binding Engagement of the Duffy Antigen on Human Erythrocytes,” has been cited 9 times, according to Thomson […] The post “The first author assumes all responsibility:” Malaria vaccine article […]
+
1:00 PM | I haven't made up my mind whether Mike is onto something with the "gentry class" designation
But it's definitely an idea worth discussing.To return to [David] Leonhardt, this is the key point:There is a good debate about what to call families who don’t have enormous wealth but who also make much more than most Americans. There is also a good debate about whether any changes to tax policy — the background to Josh’s article — should involve sacrifices from that group.In the course of the debate, though, let’s at least remain cleareyed about the fact that six figures of income […]
+
9:28 AM | Outer space: You guessed it
John D. Barrow If you are a flower then April is allegedly the cruellest month, but if you are a student of any sort then I'm sure you would have picked June. If you are a flower then April is allegedly the cruellest month, but if you are a student of any sort then I'm sure you would have picked June. June is a month of […]
+
7:52 AM | Facing the facts - Wittgenstein as a Kantian? (guest post)
For my MA course on Wittgenstein earlier this year, students had to write a short essay, blog post-style, on the Tractatus. One of them, Joseph Wilcox, took up the challenge of asking what exactly it means to say that Wittgenstein's project in the Tractatus is essentially a Kantian project --...
+
5:00 AM | Sur une (petite) erreur d'Isaac Newton
Calculer la forme de la Terre, aux temps héroïques. - L'IHP, maison d'histoires / Piste rouge, featured
+
2:00 AM | Mai 2015, 4ème défi
Pour la deuxième année, chaque semaine, un défi du calendrier mathématique... - Défis du Calendrier Mathématique

May 21, 2015

+
4:21 PM | Fake Data in Political Science
This is Joseph.One of the most challenging things in population research is the need to trust in the data and analysis done by other groups.  Unlike chemistry, we cannot simply replicate experiments without huge amounts of expense.  Furthermore, the population is getting less and less responsive to surveys.  In a very real sense, endlessly replicating strong and clean results is going to partially displace other research questions.  After all, people have a limited tolerance […]
123456789
9,698 Results